The Department of Optometry and Visual Science (DOVS) Relocation project involves the relocation of several Faculty of MDHS’s departments including the Department of Optometry and Visual Science, Eye Clinic and the re-allocation of space for physiotherapy and nursing into 200 Berkeley Street and Level one of 202 Berkeley Street.

Refurbishment works within 200 Berkeley St involves a whole of building upgrade include the replacement of all existing infrastructure to comply with current building code requirements and UoM standards. 202 Berkeley St involves whole of floor infrastructure upgrades to the north wing of the Triradiate Building to accommodate General Practice.

Due to portfolio wide capital program pressures DOVS Relocation is delivered under an accelerated programme and an Early Contract Involvement (ECI) framework. Intensive workshops with the design team and stakeholders occurred weekly to accelerate the design process. These sessions included blocking/stacking, stakeholder workshops, design documentation, tendering of separable portions and into delivery.

The Early Contract Involvement (ECI) framework is quite unique for refurbished buildings in the tertiary education sector and has provided the University with an agile procurement process primarily focused on delivering an accelerated design/construction programme to University stakeholders that is tailored to typology of the asset, space repurposing challenges, the programme, procurement and impact to the University community caused by constructing in a live environment.

The DOVS Relocation project forms part of the John Medley Bundle package of works.

The University of Melbourne’s Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences (FVAS) plan to relocate the School of Agriculture and Food (Food Science) to Levels 1, 2 and 3 Building 194 and Level 2 Building 184.

The expansion into both buildings will address the growing enrollment numbers and provide a consolidated base for Food Science Teaching and Research. The project comprises of PC1 and PC2 physical containment, fume cupboard extraction and laboratory gas provision as well as the refurbishment of multiple spaces within Building 184.

Re-purposing an ageing asset to accommodate complex space functions has presented some challenges including extensive infrastructure upgrades to current code requirement. As a result of our initial site investigations all infrastructure; MSB, thermal plant and HVAC are to be replaced to meet BCA 2019 commitments.

The University of Melbourne is delivering the project through an innovative procurement method whereby an Early Contract Involvement (ECI) Consultant forms part of the project team and the delivery procurement process is priced and built under an agreed framework. This process is quite unique for refurbished buildings in the tertiary education sector and provides the University with an agile procurement process primarily focused on providing University stakeholders with an accelerated design/construction programme tailored to typology of the asset, space re purposing challenges, the programme, procurement and impact to the University community caused by constructing in a live environment.

Australian Catholic University (ACU), together with Blacktown Regional Council are delivering a new University Campus that will sit in the heart of the local community of greater western NSW. The project includes the fit-out of 6,000 sqm across 4 floors of a 5- storey existing building in close proximity to Blacktown Train and bus stations.

With a whole of building upgrade, the infrastructure requirements to re-purpose the existing commercial office into learning and teaching spaces is key. The building will require an additional ventilation and cooling plant and vertical transportation refurbishment.

An existing B grade commercial building will be converted to hold a mixture of sim wards, lab spaces, lecture and university student support facilities.

With the ACU’s ambition of opening their new Blacktown Campus as early as possible, the design and construction programme is sequenced such that construction staging, consideration of early identification of long lead time items and the consideration that the final stages of the upgrade will happen under a live teaching environment, requiring the project team to carry out extensive and intensive collaboration sessions.

As the campus is planned to operate from 22 Main Street for at least 5 years it is essential that good quality fixtures and fittings are provided whilst demonstrating good value for money. The spaces are to be secure, welcoming, inclusive, sustainable, and flexible.

Continuing to grow its presence in the national and international academic community, Western Sydney University (WSU) has delivered benchmark teaching facilities for specialist disciplines within the Schools of Humanities and Communications Arts, and Computing Engineering and Mathematics.

The new facilities at the Parramatta South Campus replace existing cellular classrooms and traditional lecture spaces with flexible teaching spaces, dedicated studios and laboratories, such as engineering practical Labs, design studios, electrical labs, electronic lab and materials testing, mechanical and mechatronic labs and collaborative workspaces.

ADP provided electrical, fire, hydraulics, audio visual and specialist lighting.

The project involves the adaptive reuse of WSU’s Westmead Campus – Building J -the site of the former St Vincent’s Boys Home.

The heritage building is now the home to WSU’s NICM Health Research Institute. Stage 1 of the project is now complete and incorporates clinic rooms, dispensaries, and associated staff support areas.

The design for Stage 2 is currently underway and will include a range of laboratories and facilities.

ADP have proactively engaged with WSU and their internal stakeholders to ensure the design has delivered on all key university policy and guideline requirements. For example, through early engagement ADP were able to address key university energy efficiency and future maintenance requirements and coordinate the establishment of a new high efficiency central thermal plant.

Western Sydney University is engaged in a series of works to relocate a number of offices and divisions to its Hawkesbury campus.

Building R7 was originally built in 1949-1950 to offer accommodation to the increasing number of college students. The relocation of campus services is providing an opportunity to refurbish and to adaptively reuse some of these existing, historical buildings.

These new modern offices will provide meeting rooms, offices and staff amenities for 48-50 staff.

ADP are providing electrical, mechanical, fire and hydraulics for the existing building refurbishment and are designing the Central Thermal Plant which will connect a number of the heritage buildings.

Central will provide a new way of connected living for students. Within walking distance of Melbourne University, Monash College and RMIT and sitting right on the edge of the city, Central is ideally located for new students to live, learn and connect with both their city surrounds and students.

A key aspiration of the client is to provide spaces to encourage students to connect to each other, putting student care at the forefront of the project. Low maintenance and ease of serviceability are imperative. ADP have provided clever and efficient building services design, with quality services and life cycle costs as key drivers.

To provide the best service to residents, technology has been a priority, providing safe entry access through smart phones and other app and smart-building features to make every part of living there easy. The building design, including the high-quality building services, encourages a connected experience for the students with significant communal and activity spaces, all supported by the latest in building technology. The building has s strong focus on sustainable, low energy solutions with layouts and services that take advantage of natural light and ventilation.

See Details: https://journalstudentliving.com.au/central/

Within walking distance of Melbourne University, Monash College and RMIT and sitting right on the edge of the city, Uni Place is ideally located for new students to live, learn and connect with both their city surrounds and students.

The 16 level faclity will activate Leicester Street and the surrounding public realm while providing recreational and study spaces opening onto internal outdoor courtyards. A key aspiration of the client has been to provide spaces to encourage students to connect to each other, putting student care at the forefront of the project.

To provide the best service to residents, technology has been a priority, providing safe entry access through smart phones and other app and smart-building features to make every part of living here easy. ADP has assisted Journal in setting a new benchmark in Student Living, with high quality building services and the latest in building technology to promote a positive and connected student experience.

See more details: https://journalstudentliving.com.au/uni-place/

A15 Pharmacy Training Lab: This project involved the redesign and refurbishment of an existing pharmacy dispensing laboratory to current standards, ensuring that the faculty retained accreditation, while expanding the capacity of the lab to accommodate 60 students. The laboratory is located in L3 of A15 Pharmacy & Bank Building at Camperdown campus.  ADP provided mechanical, electrical, fire and hydraulics services.

A20 John Woolley Media Comm Digital Culture Department: Previously a School of Engineering, the heritage building was renamed after USYD’s first principal and is now home to the School of Letters, Art and Media. Transforming the existing space into an area suitable for mixed media and arts required removal of several laboratory areas and associated ventilation. The new spaces included secure audio-visual storage areas, workshop areas, seminar/meeting room for 20+ people with data projection and audio, kitchen breakout area, and student work drop area. ADP provided mechanical, electrical, fire and hydraulics services.

Kay Double PC2 Lab: Kay Double is an Associate Professor at the University of Sydney, and a member of the Brain and Mind Centre (formerly Brain and Mind Research Institute). The project refurbished an existing section of the building, amending an existing laboratory and creating a new PC2 laboratory, alongside support rooms, cold storage areas for samples, and an office for Associate Professor Kay Double. The cold storage required temperatures of -80°C with CO2 backup and monitoring system, along with all the associated warnings and ventilation requirements for CO2 systems. ADP provided electrical and hydraulics services.

Taking centre stage in Bendigo, the transformation of Bendigo’s Gaol to Ulumbarra Theatre has delivered a collaborative and dramatic entertainment and cultural space to both the college and the community.  Ulumbarra – meaning gather together or meeting place in the language of the Dja Dja Wurrung people reflects the original indigenous use of the site as a lookout and meeting place.

The design of the theatre draws on the prison’s heritage and inverts its relationship with the community.

To the north, the new public face of the centre opens out onto Gaol Road; inviting visitors through a break in the old gaol wall.  The Theatre’s fly tower and contemporary facilities are deliberately located to rear of the site to encourage patrons through the heart of the former prison and into the central hall which connects Ulumbarra’s old and new spaces. Ulumbarra’s plan allows for various occupants to work simultaneously either as independent users or in collaboration.